Fried Food: What’s YOUR Risk Level?

friedchicken1When it comes to eating healthy everyone can benefit. Eating fried and processed foods are not good for anyone, but it turns out that that they might be even worse for some people. How is this possible? The idea is that there is actually a gene that can increase the risk of obesity. While this does not mean that someone who has it has no options or the ability to be of a healthy weight, it does mean that they might be more negatively affected by certain foods than people who do not carry the obesity-likely gene.

Put simply, people who have genes that are more likely to make them obese see a higher risk of seeing a change in their body mass index from eating fried foods than people who do not. This is a strange and pretty big finding for people who are trying hard to control their weight. If you have ever felt like your friends can eat something with no issue but you can’t there might be more to the equation than just the question of how fast their metabolism is. It’s as if the fattening aspects of fried food have the capacity to make certain body types gain more weight than others.

One study found that women who have a high genetic risk for obesity had an average body mass index of a point higher if they ate fried foods four times a week as opposed to once a week. That can be a difference of six whole pounds on a body. When people have little genetic risk for obesity and eat that much fried food they might only raise their body mass index by half a point. So either way the fried food is going to bad for a body, but it seems to have more of an affect on people who are more genetically likely to be obese.

The research for the study that found these results took place over a long period of time and took into consideration other details like how much soda people drank, and how active or inactive they were in their life. The finding stood up through all the research, but it is still offering an association and not exactly an answer as to why.

What it does show is that “bad” food items like fried food really do have an impact on the body. It also shows that people who have a genetic predisposition to be heavier should be even more careful about how they treat their body and what they choose to put in it. It also points toward the possibility that one day we may be able to more specifically create diets based on people’s individual gene makeups to devise the healthiest eating plan for each individual.

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Categories: Men's Health